Welcoming spring: Top gardening tips for April

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The latest update from Thamesmead gardener-in-residence, Georgiana Irimia.

 

This year, April came with a wave of cold weather and a warning for gardeners: keep your seedlings protected and think twice before you start your outdoor sowing and planting. However, the cold won’t stop us from doing some exciting gardening jobs and enjoying the spring season.

 

It’s the perfect time for indoor sowing. Tomatoes, cucumbers, courgettes, squashes, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, leeks and herbs are just a few of the seeds that will happily sprout indoors this month.

 

I’ll take my chances and sow some potatoes, radishes, onion and salads outdoors after the middle of this month. If you want to do the same, make sure you keep your seeds protected by covering them with a frame or fleece overnight, especially if the temperature tends to stay low.

 

And don’t forget the flowers. Each garden should have a variety of flowers that will bring colour and joy but most importantly which will attract pollinators that will help you have a greater harvest.  You can plant summer bulbs like gladioli and dhalia or seeds for wildflowers, cosmos, cornflowers, cottage flowers, poppies, sunflowers, sweet peas and marigolds.

 

Potting on: If you started your seedlings in February, now it’s time to move them into larger, individual pots. Choose the stronger plants that have true leaves (the second pair of leaves that appear on a plant), gently separate them from the others (use a pencil and hold them from the leaves not the stem, as the stem is very fragile) and plant them into a bigger pot. Water them and keep them indoors until the weather permits to hardening them up and then transplant them outdoors. 

 

If you need more inspiration for your garden, check our social media pages for short videos about things like sowing and potting on, or visit our community gardens in person (the schedule will be available on our website soon so keep an eye out).

 

GEORGIANA IRIMIA

THAMESMEAD GARDENER-IN-RESIDENCE